Something About The Typing of the Dead ANIMATED (Loud Sound Warning) ⌨️💀

Something About The Typing of the Dead ANIMATED (Loud Sound Warning) ⌨️💀


What? Turn back now, or you are a stupid. My God, zombies! (Vigorous Typing) How could anyone do this? rip James, watch out! (Florida license plate driver) I don’t wanna die. (Dies) My God! Kill them dead hurry do it now before they type on their typers! (Typed screams) Amy! Harry! Thank God, you are all right. What the HECK’s going on in the city? James. Go and prevent the confusion in the city. No more fooling around. This is personal. ..You stand when you wipe your butt? Yeah. Doesn’t everyone? No. If you stand, your cheeks will push everything together And make it messier. Oh. Noted. Hello Gamers, I have a present for you. Thank you. GONNA KILL YOU AND I’LL KEEP KILLIN YA AND I’LL NE’ER STOP KILLING AND YOU’LL DIE A HUNDRED TIMES AND AGAIN OH NO. There’s a Dorito stuck under my F key!! (Cheezeburger laughter) Are you okay? I am okay. But Harry’s dead. What was that thing? He’s bringing dead MEMES back to life! Take Harry’s car and put an end to all of this. ok Disgusting! That place is covered in MEMES. It’s like they’re inviting us in. You’re too late.. M’LADIES. I’ve already created the perfect MEME. Behold! There is NOTHING more powerful Than ULTRA INSTINCT SHAGGY! We can’t let it back out into our world! James, what do we do?? There’s one MEME that’s strong enough to beat him. James hurry! NOOOO!!!! Across the expanse.. MEMEs echo into eternity.. WOWEE LOOK AT ALL THOSE PATRONS! Thank you so much for the support!! We did it Gary, we saved the world. Yeah (Vigorous Typing)

Hearthstone Funny Plays 277

Hearthstone Funny Plays 277


attack with hammer… hammer + ability… not so good. He will trade here 2 Lightning Bolt from here and kill him? ez, right? 15 dmg from 1 demon the only hope is mom will die early what? why he left? what is that?! lagging!

AUDIOLAND: Creating Unforgettable Sounds for Call of Duty®

AUDIOLAND: Creating Unforgettable Sounds for Call of Duty®


We work ourselves to the bone to make sure that we have a product that no one else can achieve. We have a very clear vision in our heads of what we want and we will not stop until we get it. Oh, that was very serious. It got a little dark at the end. “We will stop at nothing.” One of our philosophies as a team since day one has been. We’ve really have had the sort of startup mentality. I always think of like Guerilla Radio, the Rage Against the Machine song. When I think about us. Because it’s kind of like, We don’t go out with a big production crew. We don’t necessarily have producers go and schedule or coordinate big shoots for us. We just go out and kind of sneakily and stealthily find ways to record really awesome material. There are some benefits you get out of working that way. If you’re, for example, a weapon shoot, if you’re going to go do a weapons shoot and a lot of teams in the industry will hire an armorer and a recordist and you go to a gun range, so you feel like you have to do it right. And so you sort of play it safe. That sounds awesome. For WWII our historical advisor, Marty Morgan, owned all of these weapons. So rather than do the sort of the standard weapons shoot, we just went to Marty’s house. Because of that, you feel like you can take a lot more risk. And a lot of the stuff we get back to the studio and it totally didn’t work right. And it totally sucked, but sometimes we’ll stumble onto really awesome things that we probably wouldn’t have gotten if we played it safe. All right. Let’s see what happens. This will be run through. So one of the best experiences I’ve ever had was, and I’ve gone on a couple of these now, is to go on these firearm recording trips with the crew. By far my favorite weapon was the M1 Garand. It’s massive, it’s so heavy and it’s so accurate. Not to mention the sound quality of it is phenomenal. Because it was my very first time ever shooting a firearm. Marty gave me a bet for every time that I hit the target, he would give me a dollar. I think I got like four or five dollars out of it. Out of how many total? I think it has eight rounds, right? Yeah. So those are really cool experiences. Our very first shoot for Modern Warfare 3. That was a session where we had hired these professional recorders, right. And we didn’t shoot the guns all day long. And we but we listened to him and we got close and we checked it out. But it was until I shot, I actually fired that first gun holding it when I went, “Wow, these things sound completely different when you’re firing them than when you’re listening to them.” That was kind of one of the philosophies. Our guns weren’t just recordings of the weapons. We wouldn’t enhance them to make them sound as if it was on your body. Right. So you have that you have the kind of thump in your body as much as the sound of the gun. A big part of the philosophy of SHG audio is really experiencing the sound and not just hearing the sound because that informs our sound design and that informs the way that we create the sounds and thus also informing the player experience through our sounds. There is this myth, I think, with sound designers that we always know exactly what’s going to work. You know what I mean? You have a task and you’re like, “I know what I can record for this.” We do that but we experiment, right. And half of them fail. 90 percent. I was going to say half. Well, I’m better. At failing. So a lot of times, it’s yeah. It’s like that, you know, hundredth record or it might be a recording you’ve done before that you know that you’re like, oh maybe I’ll try this other recording that I did. We don’t do a ton of planning. I know it sounds bad, but I mean, sometimes we do the larger records, we’ll do planning. I know he’s laughing at me, right. But it’s more like, “OK, so I really need this thing. Let’s go to the woods now.” You know, “Let’s just drop everything and go.” So the tree burster. The Germans with artillery would come in and it would explode, it would be timed would explode not when it hit the ground, but above the ground. And the idea it would cause the trees to burst and send tree shrapnel everywhere. So we needed the sound of trees tearing apart. And so went out to the forest nearby here. Caisley and I, we picked up a bunch of branches and logs and we took a sledgehammer and we would lay them out and then we would just swing the sledgehammer and smash the branches and they would break and crack and fly. You know, send sort of bits of wood everywhere and sounded awesome. There was another time. Actually, I was out hiking with my son in a forest and we found this huge redwood tree that had fallen onto another and it had broken it open. Splintered huge log sized chunks of redwood tree. And so my son and I were out there ripping chunks of this redwood tree down and take all those bits and Caisley worked his magic on them. We don’t like to record foley inside foley studios. We did some experimentation with that and we never thought it sounded real enough or correct enough. And so a lot of our foley record on location. So we’re trying to find like a blown-out building above the Golden Gate Bridge. There’s old like gun emplacements which were these huge like concrete rooms up on the side of the mountain above the Golden Gate Bridge. And so the first time we went there, it was for Advanced Warfare and were looking for… In the Detroit level. You’re kind of walking through a school and there’s like you’re crunching on glass and broken stuff and it’s just like trash. And it’s kind of echoey in the school. And so we went up there and we found this room that was just frightening. We were like grabbing handfuls of rock and there were bottles and stuff around. I had my combat boots on. Caisley was, you know, kind of blindly following me in the dark and we were just like sort of crunching around in this room and making footstep sounds. And they man, they just turned out they were amazing. Just the natural reflection. You just can’t beat that. I was actually driving to work and I saw that there was going to be an air show with WWII bombers. I was like, great this is the perfect opportunity. So I called the airport where that was going to take place and asked if I could get out on the runway. And they said, “Absolutely not.” And so then we had to think outside the box and think how we were gonna get this. So we were sort of looking around on some maps. And I saw that there was a golf course right at the end of the runway. And like hole three was like literally right where they would be taking off. And so a couple of us went out and bought a round of golf for the day and this is the bag and we literally put our recorders in the golf bag with the clubs and drove out to hole three. And we literally played hole three all day long and we would just be putting along. We just couldn’t sink that putt. Yeah, we couldn’t sink that putt. And
we were letting people play through. And we would just be chipping away. And then we’d see this bomber come out on the runway. We’d throw the clubs down and get the recorders out and run up and record. It was amazing. It was all day. It was bomber after bomber. We got all these flybys and takeoffs and landings. It was awesome. I think the pure amount of recording we actually do is significantly more than what a lot of other audio teams do because I think there are a lot of teams in the industry that to no fault of their own right who rely a lot on sample libraries and licensed libraries. And we do that as rarely as possible. And the amount of field recording we do, compared to stories that I hear from some of my other friends and colleagues in the industry just seems significantly more on this team than anywhere else. There are plenty of times on the weekend where I’ll be doing something that just have my recorder with me and something will happen that I’ll have to record it, at least for an idea, if not for actual source. But it’s like we never stop thinking about possible recording opportunities. We’re always thinking about what we could contribute. I was supposed to come up with the Walker Tank and I was totally struggling with it. I didn’t know like everything I tried wasn’t working and I was just sort of frustrated because I had the sound in my head. I just didn’t know how to make it happen. And one night I was sleeping and I totally had my recorder on my bedside table. And I went to sleep. I woke up and I heard the Walker Tank like I heard the sound that was in my head. I was like, “Oh my gosh, it’s outside somewhere.” And so I grabbed my recorder and ran outside and it was my garbage truck. The garbage truck had this huge arm and it was on this chain-like system thing with hydraulics and would grab the cans and ratchet them up and dump them and bring it down and drop it and open up. And I was like, “Oh my gosh, this is perfect.” There are so many interesting little bits to this. And so I ran up and knocked on the door. And said to the garbage truck driver
and said, “Hey, can I follow you around to record this? And he was like, “Yeah, sure.” And so I followed him around for like 100 hundred houses through my neighborhood with my recorder with this guy right here and just recorded all these great sounds and that was it. Like, I came back and I was like, “Dude, Caisley, listen to this.” We fired it up and in my room and like just alone, just raw recordings were so cool. I was tasked with making the sound for the drones and one in particular drone in the level where you’re sneaking around. I tried a bunch of things but ended up with a couple of neat elements for the engine of the drone. One of them was a beard trimmer, obviously processed, but very basic sound. And then I also recorded a little handheld fan and then together, the two of those kind of made the sort of engine. Didn’t you put tape on it? Put tape on the front or something? Exactly. So if you put tape on the blades, a little fan, actually, it has a nice buzz kind of purrs. Remember the recording we did? We went to the optometrist. Oh, yeah. So because I wanted to also give the drone these like almost like the sound of like lenses shifting like it was. I mean, there was no actual animation for it, but I thought it would be kind of a cool little clicking sound. And so Don and I went to an optometrist and recorded all their equipment. And so there’s some of that layered in there, too. It’s kind of cool. If you’ve never seen a tank in real life, if you’ve never climbed in one and we’re able to like shut and locked the hatch, it’s a little fun. I remember we were in one of the APCs. We opened up all the hatches. Dave’s on one side, I’m on the other. Where we’re going really fast off-road and the driver just like hits, the trench break, and just 90-degree pivots and turns. And I just remember falling straight into Dave. Like full I don’t know if you remember that Dave. Yeah. It’s permanently ingrained into my memory. Those tanks, they grip off-road and when they turned we were hanging out the side of the tank. You have bruises all over your ribs. Everyone had a point. I had the right tread. Dave had the left tread. Grimm had the exhaust. You know, everyone had a specific location to record on the tank as it’s hauling on this open field. Dave and I were running next to the tank trying to get the treads and we kept going and running and that was back when I was younger and healthier. But this guy was like, you know, just chasing these things constantly. I was wearing flip flops and was 90. It was literally like 95, 100 degrees out and it just went back and forth. And it’s really exhausting. One interesting thing is about this sort of contrasting science fiction versus reality is that, you know, conventional wisdom would suggest that science fiction is, you know, it’s more liberating and harder to do. You know, it’s been more difficult to come up with those sounds. You have all this freedom and so much fun. And that realism has got to be obviously kind of boring because it’s just realism. But it’s actually I find that it’s almost the opposite. When we record something, it doesn’t really sound great by itself. You know, it’s going to need some work to ultimately become a sound. That is very true of reality. So we actually have to invent reality. It’s almost more of an achievement because it’s so difficult. You have to take your source and invent reality. But you also have to enhance it. But with enough restraint to make it believable to not only us but the average listener. And it’s at least for me, you just absolutely know when you’ve hit that. It’s not like, “Yeah, maybe. This might be the ballpark.” For me, it’s like, “OK, that’s it. I can put this in the game. It’s done.” Particularly with a historical game. I mean, there was some pressure. We felt it as a team. A sense of making sure that things were accurate. We’re dealing with WWII And there’s sort of reverence to WWI. And we wanted to make sure that every part of that was accurate. And at the same time, it’s hard to find those things to record. Right. You know, there’s not a lot of those planes or those tanks like functioning. There was a lot of work to just find the source to actually record. We wanted the tanking in the game to have a very unique sound and almost like a character, like almost like an animal. So I was doing some research trying to find some different YouTube videos of similar engines that the tanks would have used. And I find a video of a dude who you can’t tell what’s going on at first, but he has an engine on a block and he’s firing it up and everyone has hearing protection on because it’s just loud. And I immediately sent it to Dave and I’m like. You were like, “This is it! This is our engine. This is what the tanks sound like.” We thought, “How are we gonna get this engine?” Your detective work. So I thought, well, why don’t we just try to find that dude and that engine? So I emailed them and I was just like, can we come? We saw this video. Your engine’s awesome. We totally want to record it. Would that be OK? It took a while, but eventually, he warmed up and we went out to his place and met him. And fast forward like three weeks and we’re all standing there with our mics in the exact same place, the same engine only we’re recording it. And it turned out it was great. We can sort of play the engine like an instrument. I remember just almost conducting it right where I was doing this with my hand and he was following me and revving the engine exactly how we needed it to. I remember being there and he would crank the engine in a certain way. And we’d all look, at each other like, “Do that again, it sounds so good?” We have the thing that’s the Caisley Oh because we always get stuck in recordings, where he’s like “That sounds really good” and we’re like, “Caisley, shut
up!” Not true. Not true. After our first game as a studio, we were trying to determine what our sound was like, we wanted a sound for a Sledgehammer. We didn’t want to be generic. We wanted to be super unique. And so there was a time actually where we sat down and we listened to every great sounding thing we could get our hands on. We started to narrow down and pick out the aesthetics that we like. These are the things that we think sound really cool. And we started to hone in on what we wanted. The Sledgehammer sound to be. One of the coolest compliments I got was hearing people talk about our game saying, “Oh yeah, that sounds like a Sledgehammer game,” and I was like, “Awesome!” There’s a unique enough sound that we will say that. That sounds like a Sledgehammer game.

♪ ALIEN VS PREDATOR THE MUSICAL – Animated Parody Song

♪ ALIEN VS PREDATOR THE MUSICAL – Animated Parody Song


We just want to spread our species, Using human hosts to breed. Did it in games and movies, Til Yaucha challenged our needs. Preds and xenos fight, While claiming our lives. Survival’s slim, at least we should try. Aliens attack, Plasma cannons blast, Humans can only run away fast. Hunting down worthy foes is fun, How our right of passage is done. Soldiers with guns are great to slay, But one creature’s better prey. Preds and xenos fight, While claiming our lives. Survival’s slim, at least we should try. Aliens attack, Plasma cannons blast, Humans can only run away fast. Our luck won’t last. Humans and preds always worry about survival, With their p**** shoulder cannons and nooby pulse rifles. Xenos aren’t afraid, die for the good of the hive, Once your ammo is spent, there’s no way that you’ll survive. Climb on ceilings and walls, popping out of the vents, Making motion trackers beep, getting everyone tense. Preds think they’re so cool with all the gear on their belts, But if they use their wrist blades, our acid blood makes ‘em melt. Whoo! Preds and xenos fight, While claiming our lives. Survival’s slim, at least we should try. Aliens attack, Plasma cannons blast, Humans can only run away fast. Our luck won’t last.

Very sad music – “Goodbye, My Friend” – Crying music instrumental – Emotional Film Movie Soundtracks

Very sad music – “Goodbye, My Friend” – Crying music instrumental – Emotional Film Movie Soundtracks


How Oldschool Sound/Music worked


David: Hello, this is David from The 8-Bit Guy, and today I’ve got a special guest star with me, Rob from The Obsolete Geek. Rob: Today, we’re going to talk about how “old school” music works. Part 1: Beeper Speaker David: In the early days of home computers, most of them just had a simple “beeper speaker”. Examples would be the IBM PC and the Apple II. These speakers were controlled directly by the computer’s CPU. The speaker could make clicking noises and the CPU would have to time the clicking noises exactly right in order to produce certain tones. If a programmer wanted to spend the time, some very advanced sound of music could be produced this way, But, the trouble was it would require all of the CPU’s run time to accomplish that, leaving nothing leftover for the computer to do anything else. (Noid Laugh) Part 2: FM Synthesizer David: So, by the early 1980s, most computers and game consoles had dedicated sound chips to take this load away from the CPU. Each system at that time had a very characteristic sound along with its unique style of graphics, which helped to give each system its own personality. OK. So, the first thing you need to understand is that different systems had different numbers of voices or “Channels”. To better explain how that works, let me show you this old musical keyboard. It only has a single voice, and as you can see, it cannot play more than one note at a time. In order to do that, you will need to have at least two voices. Now, this keyboard here, is considerably more advanced than the other one. And it has a total of 4 voices, that means you can play up to 4 notes at the same time. So, having multiple voices is great, but those voices also need to be flexible as in able to create different types of waveforms. For example, this keyboard can change the waveform of it’s voice to produce different types of sound. OK, so let’s have a look at two of the more popular systems from the 1980s in order to see two different approaches to creating music. The Nintendo Entertainment System had five voices, And the Commodore 64 had 3 voices. Now, you might immediately assume that Nintendo was better, but actually it wasn’t. Here’s why. The voices used in the NES, was in the most part stuck making one type of sound. The first two voices can only produce
square waves that sound like this. The third voice can only produce a
triangle and is typically used for the low bass notes The fourth voice can only
produce noise. And the fifth voice is for PCM sampled sounds, which was rarely used. But a good example would be Super Mario Brothers 3. You can clearly hear the steel drum
sounds being used. Because the way Nintendo music worked, all
game music sounded pretty much exactly the same. The tune might be different, but it was
like they used the same instrument so to speak. The Commodore 64 had three voices, it
could produce four different types of waveforms Square, Triangle, Sawtooth, and Noise. Or
any combination of those. In the early days most programmers would just assign
a certain sound to a particular voice and just leave it that way throughout the
entire song. That was the simplest thing to do. Here’s an example from the game M.U.L.E. But not long after some clever
programmers realized that it was possible to dynamically reassign the voices to
other wave forms on the fly. This gave the illusion of having more
than three voices. Take this example from Commando. In order to better understand what’s
going on here, try listening to one voice at a time. A few years later the IBM PC finally got
a decent sound upgrade in the form of the AdLib card which used the Yamaha YM 3812
sound chip. Shortly after the market share was lost,
in favor of the SoundBlaster card which also used the same YM 3812 sound chip. So this chip was basically the
foundation of computer music in the IBM PC world for the next 10 years. The YM
3812 had nine voices and much like the Commodore 64 the voices were
independently programmable. Incidentally this chip was also used in several
Yamaha keyboard such as this one. Take a look inside and you’ll see the YM
3812 sound chip. It’s almost as if you could take a SoundBlaster card and attach keys and speakers to it and you could play it
like an instrument. So take a listen to this little sample
of music from the game Ultima 6. And now listen as I recreate that same
sound on this keyboard. Alright so let’s talk about sampling for
a moment. Now one of the neat things about this keyboard that I haven’t shown you
yet, this this came out on 1985 and has four voices, but one of the things that
makes it interesting is it’s a sampling keyboard, and let me show you exactly
what that means. “8-Bit Guy!” So this was not the only
device to come out in 1985 that featured a four voice sampling system. The
other was the Commodore Amiga. The Commodore Amiga was the first affordable
home computer that featured a four voice stereo sampling sound system. And with it came a new type of computer
music known as the Modtracker. These were music files that contains samples of
different sounds and then the associated music information. The original mod tracker used a four
track system designed around the Amiga sound chip, but later versions
eventually added many more tracks for more sophisticated sound cards. This type of format is still in use
today as a method for composing new music. The Mod Tracker format is not used
quite so often anymore with the abundance of storage and memory on
modern machines, they pretty much just forego all of that type of music
synthesis in favor of just using one gigantic sample usually in the form of
like an mp3 file or something like that. All right, well that about wraps that up
I hope you found that interesting, maybe learn something you maybe didn’t already
know It also may have come to your attention
that I have changed the name of my channel The reason is, it’s been pointed out to
me on several occasions that I haven’t made real videos about Apple iBooks in
quite some time so I changed the name from the iBook Guy to the 8-Bit Guy
because it’s a little bit more representative of what I actually do
here. Also I want to take a moment to thank
Rob for being on my show, and why don’t you tell us a little bit about your
channel for a moment. Thank you for having me on your show, I’m
a big fan of your channel and one of the things I like to talk about on my
channel are a little bit more obscure, a little more unusual hardware as it
relates to video games. Like this Sharp x68000 computer from Japan, One of my
all-time favorite systems. And if you want to see a little bit more about this
piece of obscure equipment, there’s a link down in the description
field that you can click to take you over to his channel, and he’s got a lot of other
really obscure stuff in his collection that you can have a look at. Alright,
well also don’t forget to visit me on Facebook and I’ll see you a next time!

Tinder In Real Life Dating Game To Find New CRUSH! (Best Friend GMI Agent Missing) Rebecca Zamolo

Tinder In Real Life Dating Game To Find New CRUSH! (Best Friend GMI Agent Missing) Rebecca Zamolo


KIA Motors x LECtronic: I want the LEC back!

KIA Motors x LECtronic: I want the LEC back!


My nights are empty Missing you everyday I wish that you’d come back, to me It was every weekend Bringin’ me nothin’ but joy I need to get my life, on track I want the LEC back,
So I can spam in the chat, want the LEC back in my life Rap Battles, Medi-Vedi, feelin alright,
want the LEC back tonight Recharged, all amped for spring split E-U-phoria, I can start to feel it Now it’s time,
LEC’s gonna give me what, I want I wanna watch PGL and – ready check too I wanna vote on Twitter,
and talk about who threw I wanna flame on reddit and tweet
how I always knew I want the LEC back,
So I can spam in the chat, I want the LEC back in my life Rap Battles, Medi-Vedi, feelin alright,
want the LEC back tonight So tell me, who was THE player of the game? Now here comes the new year,
New teams and players too Now here comes the new year,
Lost some but thats alright Now here comes the new year,
Hope your ready for, a long fight I want the LEC back,
So I can spam in the chat, want the LEC back in my life Rap Battles, Medi-Vedi, feelin alright,
want the LEC back tonight I want the LEC back Want the LEC back in my life I Want the LEC back Want the LEC back tonight

Sad background music – Dramatic Film Movie Soundtracks / Scores – Fesliyan Studios Instrumental

Sad background music – Dramatic Film Movie Soundtracks / Scores – Fesliyan Studios Instrumental