The Wilhelm Scream and Iconic Sounds of Horror Cinema (feat. Monstrum’s Emily Zarka)

The Wilhelm Scream and Iconic Sounds of Horror Cinema (feat. Monstrum’s Emily Zarka)


Have you ever wondered how those sounds became
associated with horror films? Sounds are critical to most films– they can
help establish a scene’s mood, provide insight into characters, and alert the viewer to important
information. There are two major camps of film soundscapes. Sounds that the audience can hear (but the
characters on screen cannot) are considered non-diegetic. They can be used to signal impending danger,
like background music. Diegetic sounds are ones that the characters
on screen can hear and react to, like someone screaming. This particular music is made by a theremin,
an electronic musical instrument played without being touched. The box has a vertical antenna on its top
and a metal loop on the side. The musician controls the pitch by varying
the distance of one hand from the antenna and controls the volume by moving the other
hand around the metal loop. The theremin then amplifies these electric
signals and sends them to a loudspeaker. It has a particularly “otherworldly” vibe. In 1967, the music critic Harold C. Schonberg
poetically described the sound made by the theremin as “not unlike an eerie, throbbing
voice” or “a cello lost in a dense fog and crying because it does not know how to get
home.” Which is weirdly tender to talk about the
theremin, but whatever. But despite the touching and tender sentiments
that it evoked in music critics, you may be surprised to learn that the theremin was developed
as part of a Soviet research program in the 1920s by a man who lived a life of art, espionage,
and forced exile from his adopted home. Theremin music often crops up as the non-diegetic
backdrop of our favorite horror classics. On the other hand is the diegetic movie trope
more popularly known as “the Wilhelm scream,” a stock sound effect first recorded in the
1950s and used hundreds of times since. Sometimes in action packed scenes and other
times to underscore onscreen horror that would make your blood curdle. But who the heck was Wilhelm? Why was he screaming? And why have sound engineers used this exact
scream over and over in hundreds (if not thousands!) of projects? So today we’re diving head first into the
sounds that make us scream, to figure out why these two devices started cropping up
in so many of our favorite films. So, first, a little bit of a rundown on the
theremin. In 1920, a young Russian physicist named Lev
Sergeyevich Termen was researching proximity sensors in the Physico-Technical Institute
in Petrograd. Proximity sensors are used to detect the presence
of a nearby object without physical contact. They work by emitting an electromagnetic field
(or a beam of electromagnetic radiation) and then tracking changes in the field or in the
return signal. Proximity sensors can be used in a variety
of applications, including in weapon systems. At the time that Termen was working, Russia
was embroiled in a Civil War. In this conflict, Vladimir Lenin’s Red Army
was defending his Bolshevik government against other Russian factions. Lenin had an urgent need for weapons. While researching proximity sensors for Lenin,
Termen discovered that they could also be used to produce unique sounds. He designed an “etherphone,” which isn’t
a telephone covered in ether that knocks you out when you pick it up, but rather a box
that contains vacuum tubes that produce two sound wave frequencies that oscillate above
the range of hearing. When positioned near one another, these tubes
create an audible frequency that reflect the difference in the tubes’ rates of vibration. By moving one’s hands near the box, it was
possible to alter these frequencies and make different sounds. In 1922, Termen demonstrated the instrument
for Lenin at the Kremlin. In the west, Termen became known as León
Theremin. In 1925, he traveled to Germany to sell the
patent for the instrument that the Germans dubbed the “thereminvox” to a manufacturing
firm. According to his biographer, Albert Glinsky,
the trip had two purposes. One was to make money off the sale. The other was to open a backdoor to Western
technology. Theremin toured other European countries,
demonstrating his instrument and gathering information. In the late 1920s, he and his Russian wife,
Katia, moved to New York, where Theremin set up the Theremin Laboratory, patented his instrument,
and performed at Carnegie Hall. Soon after, he sold the commercial production
rights for the “Thereminvox” to RCA, which started producing it in 1929. However, was there more to Theremin’s stay
in New York than meets the eye? It is established that Theremin had designed
tools for Lenin and also worked as a corporate spy on his behalf. Why, then, do some accounts suggest that Theremin
was taken from his New York apartment by N.K.V.D. agents (a group that would later become the
K.G.B.)? Theremin’s biographer, Glinsky, suggests
that Theremin may have fled the US to escape personal debts. Yet his reception at home was also pretty
chilly. According to the New York Times, Theremin
was convicted of anti-Soviet propaganda and sentenced to seven years of prison in Siberia
which is about as chilly as a reception gets. He was later moved to a prison in Tomsk. Here, he developed remote-control planes and
methods of tracking ships behind enemy lines. He also invented a small electronic eavesdropping
device. In 1945, one of these bugs was embedded in
a replica of the Great Seal of the United States that a group of Soviet children presented
as a “gift of friendship” to the US Ambassador to the Soviet Union. “The Thing,” as this would later be called,
transmitted information from the embassy to the K.G.B. for six years. As a reward for his contributions to Cold
War espionage, the government released Theremin from prison and granted him the Stalin Prize
(in secret, of course). According to Glinsky, many in the West assumed
that Theremin had died near the end of the Second World War. However, he continued to work for the K.G.B.
until 1966. But during the period that he was away from
the United States, the theremin became a niche instrument. In the 1950s, Robert Moog began building theremins
as a hobby. Later, he mass-produced theremin-building
kits. Moog claims that tinkering with these kits
helped him develop the Moog analog synthesizer, a device that altered the sound of many late-20th
century works of music. The music has cropped up in the works of a
wide range of classical musicians who use it in their performances. But it’s probably more famously known for
its appearances in popular films. Although it’s hard to pin down the first
date the theremin appeared, some of its earliest appearances are in film soundtracks that require
an eerie, other-worldly vibe. The composer, Miklós Rózsa, used the instrument
in film scoring in 1945, when he wrote the score for “The Lost Weekend.” And he won the Academy Award using it in the
score for Alfred Hitchcock’s suspenseful “Spellbound.” In 1947, Rózsa used it in the score for the
film “The Red House.” In 1951, Bernard Herrmann followed suit and
used the theremin in his score for “The Day the Earth Stood Still.” More recently, it has been used in the soundtracks
for “Ed Wood,” “The Machinist,” “Monster House,” and “First Man”. So, the next time that you hear this, you
can think of Cold War espionage and the fascinating life of the man who made the sound possible. Has someone been shot? Is a stormtrooper falling from a ledge? Is an alien flying into space after an explosion? Not today. I am simply pushing a button that plays “The
Wilhelm Scream,” a stock sound effect from the Warner Brothers library. Much as theremin music contributes to the
viewer’s experience of a movie scene, this particular scream resonates with the viewer
on two levels. This scream seems to be diegetic sound–that
is to say, a sound that one character makes and that other characters in the movie might
hear. But it’s actually a stock sound effect that
is added to the film after production. For those in the know, the familiar sound
of the Wilhelm scream draws attention to the constructed nature, or “fakeness,” of
the violence being presented visually. Its effect can be to ironize the violence
and (perhaps) even to alter its significance. And here’s PBS’ resident monster expert,
Dr. Emily Zarka from Monstrum to tell us a little more about it. The Wilhelm Scream is named after Private
Wilhelm, a character in the 1953 Western movie, “The Charge at Feather River,” who had
the rather unfortunate fate of being shot in the thigh by an arrow. As Sean Hutchinson has reported in “Mental
Floss,” a group of sound designers at USC’s film school during the 1970s observed that
this scream had been used in many films and named it after this character. However, the sound effect had, in fact, been
used earlier, in the 1951 film, “Distant Drums,” as a soldier walking through a swamp
in the Everglades is attacked by an alligator and dragged underwater, and again in the 1952
film, “Springfield Rifle,” as a raider is stabbed with a sword. The scream is widely thought to have been
made by the actor/musician, Sheb Wooley, who had been a voice extra on “Distant Drums”
and who, in 1958, would gain fame for recording the popular song, “Purple People Eater.” The USC film school students began adding
the effect into the films that they were making as a sort of in-joke. One of the students, Ben Burtt, went on to
design the sound on George Lucas’ “Star Wars.” Burtt used the sound effect after Luke Skywalker
shoots a Stormtrooper, who screams as he falls from a ledge in the Death Star. Burtt would later incorporate the scream into
other films in the “Star Wars” series. Several film enthusiasts have painstakingly
compiled these scenes in online videos. In February 2018, Matthew Wood, Supervising
Sound Editor for Skywalker Sound, announced that the studio was going to move away from
using the Wilhelm scream in Star Wars Films and has already started using a new scream
that he dubs, “our own little calling card” Keep your ears open for these! Thanks Emily! But even though Star Wars gave Wilhelm a sonic
facelift, the old Wilhelm Scream is still peppered throughout our favorite films. It’s even cropped up in scenes that are
lighter on the horror and action side, showing these hollering pipes really do have the range. Ben Burtt won Special Achievement and Best
Sound Effects Editing Academy Awards for his work on the Indiana Jones series. In one scene, he uses the scream as a crocodile
eats a man, making a subtle gesture towards the film, “Distant Drums.” Other notable films that also use the scream
are Lord of the Rings, Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill Volume 1, Inglorious Bastards, Toy Story,
and Avatar (to name just a few!). A website called “TVTropes.org” has compiled
an extensive list of uses of the scream in anime , animated and live action films, literary
references, television shows, music, pinball games, video games, and web animation. Check it out if you have some free time. Or a lot of free time, because it’s a long
list. It’s a real scream! I’m sorry, but you had to know that I was
going to do that somewhere in here

“Benda Bilili: Achieving Dreams through Music” – practice English with Spotlight

“Benda Bilili: Achieving Dreams through Music” – practice English with Spotlight


Welcome to Spotlight. I’m Ryan Geertsma. And I’m Robin Basselin. Spotlight uses a
special English method of broadcasting. It is easier for people to understand no matter
where in the world they live. Every year in May, actors, film makers and
experts gather together in Cannes, France. They gather for the international Cannes Film
Festival. There, they watch new films from all over the world. And groups of experts
judge the films. In 2010, one of those new films was called Benda Bilili! Filmmakers
Renaud Barret and Florent de la Tullaye created this film. In it, they tell a true story of
an unusual music group from the city of Kinshasa. Today’s Spotlight is on this film and the
Staff Benda Bilili music group. Kinshasa is in the Democratic Republic of
the Congo. Life in this city can be difficult. Most people suffer from poverty. Often, they
do not have enough food to eat. And large groups of people live together in shelters.
In these conditions diseases like polio spread very easily. Papa Ricky Lickabu and Coco Ngambali grew
up in Kinshasa. They both had the disease polio as children. Polio left Papa Ricky and
Coco disabled or handicapped. The two men could not use their legs. However, both men could play music. In fact,
they were extremely skilled. Still, many people could not look beyond their handicaps. Papa
Ricky told BBC News that he could not find work as a musician. “When I went to see my musician friends
to look for work, they did not want to work with me even though I knew how to sing and
play the guitar. They did not want to work with me at all because I am handicapped. They
said ‘You are always late and you cannot dance. Working with us just will not work.’” So Papa Ricky and Coco started their own music
group called Staff Benda Bilili. Soon, other musicians joined their group. They were also
handicapped from polio. Some played instruments. Some sang. And some of them even danced by
using their hands like feet. All of the men worked other jobs during the
day. But, they played their music as often as they could. The men of Staff Benda Bilili
believed they could do anything they wanted, even with their physical handicaps. Benda
Bilili means “look beyond appearances.” And this is what they wanted people to do
– look beyond their physical handicaps. The members of Staff Benda Bilili dreamed of being
famous for their music, not for their handicaps. They hoped that one day their music would
even be popular in Europe. Staff Benda Bilili started by playing their
music on street corners. They played their music outside bars and restaurants where people
ate. People liked their music and gave them money. But the musicians did not earn enough
money to stop working their other jobs. Then, in 2004, filmmakers Renaud Barret and
Florent de la Tullaye heard Staff Benda Bilili performing in the streets. In their film Benda
Bilili!, Barret describes how they felt when they first met these musicians. “When we met Staff Benda Bilili on the corner
of a street… We immediately loved these undiscovered, skilled musicians. Their songs
were about living on the streets of a city that had no mercy. Their music went straight
to our hearts.” After that, they decided they wanted to work
with this music group. They wanted to help them make a music album. And they wanted to
film the process. Staff Benda Bilili and the filmmakers began to work together. The filmmakers
recorded everything. They filmed the musicians as they practiced their music at the Kinshasa
zoo. They filmed the musicians when they played in the streets. They even filmed the musicians
when they were not playing music. And they were filming when Staff Benda Bilili met Roger
Landu, a 13-year-old musician. Roger worked in Kinshasa to support his family.
He created his own instrument from a bent wood bow, a tin can, and one metal wire. He
called his instrument a satonge. With it, he played popular songs to make money. Papa
Ricky and Staff Benda Bilili heard Roger play and were very amazed. Papa Ricky knew that
Roger could be a very skilled musician if he trained more. So Papa Ricky invited Roger
to join Staff Benda Bilili. Roger practiced with the group. He learned from the more experienced
musicians. Soon he began to perform with them. After a while, the group went to a music studio
to record their first music album. Recording was not easy. The musicians made many mistakes.
And during the recording, Papa Ricky’s wife called. She told him there was a fire. The
fire destroyed the shelter where many of them lived. As a result, the men went home – without
finishing their album. A year later, Barret and de la Tullaye came
back to Kinshasa. They had found a music recording company that would help Staff Benda Bilili
create their first music album. In their film, Barret and de la Tullaye show Papa Ricky encouraging
the rest of the group before recording. “Let us put our problems away until we have
an album in our hands.” Finally, in March, 2009, after five years
and many difficulties, Staff Benda Bilili finished recording their album. They called
it “Très Très Forť,” which means very, very strong. A few months later, they travelled
to Europe to play for a music celebration event in France. Staff Benda Bilili continues to travel and
play their music – sometimes for crowds with thousands of people. The men of Staff Benda
Bilili have seen their dream become real. Their music became famous in many countries
around the world. And they travelled to Europe. They achieved this because they never stopped
hoping and working hard. Staff Benda Bilili is also thinking about the future. Music gave
Papa Ricky and the other men hope. It helped them think positively about the future. They
want to share that hope and positive thinking with future generations. De la Tullaye explained, “With the money they earn from the film,
they want to start an organization. They want to build a place to teach young musicians
and continue the Staff Benda Bilili experience.” Staff Benda Bilili should have no trouble
achieving their new dream. Roger is a good example. He learned a great deal from the
men of Staff Benda Bilili. He said, “I am the youngest member of the group.
I grew up with the others, so I cannot let them down. When I met Ricky, he told me that
someday I would become the leader of the Staff Benda Bilili. So I have a lot of responsibility
and a lot of work to left to do.” The writer of this program was Courtney Schutt.
The producer was Ryan Geertsma. The voices you heard were from the United States and
the United Kingdom. All quotes were adapted and voiced by Spotlight. You can find our
programs on the internet at www.radioenglish.net. This program is called “Benda Bilili: Achieving
Dreams through Music.”

Main Tota Main Tota | मैं तोता मैं तोता | Kids Tv | Hindi Rhymes For Kids

Main Tota Main Tota | मैं तोता मैं तोता | Kids Tv | Hindi Rhymes For Kids


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The Guy Who “Doesn’t Know” Mainstream Music

The Guy Who “Doesn’t Know” Mainstream Music


– If you go into a
California Pizza Kitchen, and you say that it’s your birthday, they have to make you a manager. – I don’t think that’s true. – Everyone! Discard your bologna and heed my words! I’m going to the Beyonce concert! – Oh, my god! Are you serious? – Yes, she’s playing at The Fonda tonight. – Oh, hey, cool. I’m gonna be at The Fonda tonight, too. – Rav! – Wow, the Hive is strong in this office. – I didn’t know that you liked Beyonce. Where’s your seats? – Oh, no, no, no, no, no. I’m not going to see Beyonce? I’m going to a Jumbo
Lake Michigan concert. They’re a German crunk-core band. – Who? Who?
– Who? – Who? – Jumbo Lake Michigan! It’s like, my favorite band! – Raf, you didn’t really just spend $300 for the opening act, like
these are Beyonce tickets. – I mean, I didn’t even
know there was another band playing besides Jumbo Lake Michigan, but, is your friend good? – You mean, Beyonce? – Hello? Yeah she’s–
– This is the Queen– Beyonce.
– The Queen Bey. – Oh! You’re talking about Queenie
McBaggins on synth French Horn. – No, no! – Yes, she really kills it. She’s gotta be at least,
top five French horn players on Jumbo Lake Michigan. – How many are there? – About fourteen. – Literally, I’ve never heard of this band until you brought them up now. – Jumbo Lake Michigan is
a little bit underground, but their sound is indescribable. It’s like, Lil’ Jon meets– – Wait, you just it’s indescribable. – The New York Philharmonics– – Now you’re describing it. – Meets Hans Gruber in “Die Hard.” – Yuck. – How is this freak show band
playing at a Beyonce concert? – I think Behamma is playing
with Jumbo Lake Michigan because she used to collaborate
with our lead vocalist, on like, a very small project,
like, twenty years ago. Her name’s Kelly Rowland. – Of Destiny’s Child? – Never heard of it. (sighs) – But, Jumbo Lake Michigan
discovered Kelly Rowland at an open mic in Omaha in 2007. She was in a real dark place. Said she’d give anything
to be a lead singer. – That’s ridiculous. – Actually, I kinda believe that. – You really haven’t heard of Beyonce? “Irreplaceable?”
– So good. “Single Ladies?
– Love it. – “Drunk in Love?” – No, sorry, must not get
a whole lot of air play, but you must have heard
Jumbo Lake Michigan’s classic single. (speaking in foreign language) And then it’s like– – What is this? – An eight-minute
kettlebell solo, you know! – No, we don’t know. – You do that the kettlebell is not a musical instrument, right? – Nothing is a musical instrument if it’s not in the hands a true artist. I mean, come on! – See, that’s a Beyonce shirt! I knew it! You’re not cool and unique. You like Beyonce just
like the rest of us, baby. – You got him. – No, this is a Jumbo
Lake Michigan t-shirt. – But, “Lemonade” is Beyonce’s album. – Really? Jumbo Lake Michigan’s last visual album was inspired by refreshing summer drinks. It’s really deep, though,
maybe a little over your head? – Oh, my gosh, Raf! You’re going to Beyonce concert! You’re gonna see Beyonce! You’re not better than the rest of us because of your obscure music taste! – Oh, no, no, no, no, no. Oh, god. I’m better than you because
of my obscure film tastes. – There it is. – I’m just saying, I
own “The Bicycle Thief.” God.
– On VHS!

How The Sound Effects In ‘A Quiet Place’ Were Made | Movies Insider

How The Sound Effects In ‘A Quiet Place’ Were Made | Movies Insider


“A Quiet Place” was one of the most
unlikely hits of 2018. Made on a budget of just 17 million
dollars the horror film would go on to gross more than 332 million dollars
worldwide. Emily Blunt earned praise for her performance and actor John Krasinski
had his first major breakthrough as a director. One thing that makes the movie
so unique: its use of sound. “A Quiet Place” is set in a post-apocalyptic world
overrun with monsters with ultra sensitive hearing. Make a single sound
and you’re in big trouble therefore the characters communicate in
sign language and make the lightest of footsteps. While the movie has a
groundbreaking lack of sound that doesn’t mean it’s completely absent of
it. Brandon Jones, Ethan van Der Ryn and Eric Aadahl of E Squared are responsible
for much of what you hear on screen. “Sound was actually written into the
script and so for us it was like a dream come true like kids in a candy store.”
Here’s how some of the movie’s most notable sounds were made. Foley, a method
in which objects are used to create sounds made by humans, or in this case
monsters, was used. “A Foley stage is a super quiet environment where we can put
picture up on the screen and then record using our microphones in sync with the
picture.” Some sounds like a shotgun loading and water splashing were made
exactly as you’d expect. For other sounds they had to get
creative The most unusual sound might be the
echolocation sounds used to illustrate how the monsters get around without
vision. To make this sound they settled on putting a stun gun up to a patch of
grapes. They then manipulated the sound in
the next phase: the editing process. “The whole concept with these creatures is
there’s kind of an electromagnetic component so using something electrical
as a source for the vocals seemed to kind of make sense. So here’s our recording of
the stun gun [buzzing] We can take that sound and slow it down
and we can hear the individual electric clicks Not every sound effect requires Foley
for the sound of a baby crying Brandon Jones recorded the sound of his baby
nephew crying. One of the biggest challenges of this movie wasn’t what you
heard with ease, but the kind of sounds we might normally tune out. Footsteps are
a classic Foley noise any sound designer is used to making. Usually it’ll
be loud… but for “A Quiet Place” the team had to account for the fact that the
characters mostly walked around barefoot. “Where we would play Foley footsteps,
and where not to, were really dictated by the logic of the film. On a lot of why shots
we didn’t even shoot the Foley for those feet if we can hear it from such a
distance the creatures can too. And then when you
cut into an extreme close-up and you see a foot push through sand then we hear it
just chiaroscuro.” The scariest sound of all though: the lack of sound! “It’s rare
that you get to work on a movie that has this much like absolute silence and
parts where music and dialogue’s all stripped away and it’s just these faint
details. One of the biggest things that happened throughout the course of
post-production for this movie was really scaling back and being more
minimalist in the creature sound design because our first pass had him making
noise all over the place and we kept scaling back and making it kind of a ‘less
is more’ approach.” Following in the path of one of the great monster movies
before it “Jaws,” the less we see, or in this case the less we hear from the
monsters, the more terrifying they are and yet good luck getting that stun gun
sound out of your head now

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